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Russia Demands Apple And Google To Remove Blocked LinkedIn From Local App Stores


Russia Demands Apple And Google To Remove Blocked LinkedIn From Local App Stores
Russia demanded Apple and Google to take down the app of Microsoft-owned LinkedIn from the country's app stores. LinkedIn's website was blocked by Russia in November of last year, as the service was said to have violated data localization laws. ( Carl Court | Getty Images )

Russia has demanded Apple and Google to take down the app of LinkedIn, the professional social networking website that was blocked in the country last year, from local app stores. The move mirrors China’s request for Apple to remove apps by The New York Times from the country’s App Store.

LinkedIn Taken Down From App Stores In Russia

Smartphones users in Russia, whether they are using iOS or Android devices, will no longer be able to download the LinkedIn app after the country’s government demanded Apple and Google to remove the app from the Russian versions of the App Store and the Google Play Store.


According to a report by The New York Times, the demand of Russia to take down LinkedIn from the country’s app stores places Apple and Google in a difficult position, as both of them push for free speech and an open internet, but are being asked to be agents of censorship for the government.

The removal of the app from app stores, along with the previous blocking of the website, will not be enough to completely cut off access to LinkedIn’s content from within Russia, due to the presence of other methods such as using a VPN. However, the move sends a signal that countries such as Russia and China have the power to demand major tech companies such as Apple and Google to take down apps.

Why Was LinkedIn Blocked In Russia?

LinkedIn, owned by Microsoft, was blocked in Russia after a court ruling claimed that the professional social networking website violated the country’s data laws. According to the data laws of Russia, websites could only store and process personal information of its citizens within Russian servers. LinkedIn, which had more than 6 million users in the country, did not meet this requirement.

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